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Being In The Flow

A VC - 8 hours 19 min ago

I have been investing in developer tools since the earliest days of my VC career. The first investment I led in the late 80s was a financing that provided the funds to acquire a programming editor called Brief. It was a text-based editor for PCs. That investment worked out but we didn’t make a lot of money on it. Brief was eclipsed by other better editors.

But that did not cool my interest in developer tools. I have always believed that supporting the people who build software is a great business and it is.

At USV, we have made developer tools a key area of investment and some of our most well-known successes like MongoDB, Twilio, and Stripe are developer tools.

But as I learned from my Brief experience, all developer tools are not equal in terms of creating business value.

Last week, I was discussing this in a texting session with my partner Nick. And he observed that the tools that have produced the most value for the founders and investors, including USV, are the tools that are “in the flow” and not on the side.

That was quite an “aha moment” for me as it clarified something that I have longed felt intuitively but could not articulate. Now I can.

I think this is true for many other areas of software. If you build software that sits in the flow of something important (mission critical, recurring, etc) then it will increase in value over time, and sustain its value, much more significantly than something that “sits on the side.”

So when thinking about what to build or what to invest in (it is the same thing, just depends on if you are investing time or money), try to be in the flow.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Entertainment vs Utility

A VC - February 17, 2020 - 7:45am

The news this week that HQ Trivia has finally called it quits reminded me of this post I wrote back in 2012 about the difference in sustainability (and thus value) between entertainment and utility apps.

What is interesting to me is if you could use a social app or an entertainment app to get to another place (distribution, platform, blockchain, financial services, etc, etc). That feels like a much more sustainable place to be.

But very few social apps and games have been able to do that. And the result has been a predictable boom/bust cycle that has not produced a lot of value for founders or investors.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: End Of The Line

A VC - February 14, 2020 - 4:18am

This Kickstarter project seeks funding to continue making a documentary about the NYC Subway Crisis. I rode the subway a lot this week and it is essential infrastructure for millions of people every day. Shining a bright light on its challenges is something I support and I backed the project today.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Tech Jobs For All Who Want Them

A VC - February 13, 2020 - 6:55am

The tech sector is the fastest growing sector of the economy in NYC and around the US and around the world. The tech sector offers high paying jobs and a growing number of them.

But, as we all know, the tech sector lacks the gender and racial diversity that would allow everyone to benefit from this growing sector of the economy. Most of the studies that have looked at the lack of diversity point to a skills gap standing in the way.

So last year Tech:NYC (where I am co-chair) and a few large employers (Google, Verizon, Bloomberg LP) and the Robin Hood Learning and Technology Fund commissioned a study of the skills training programs in NYC to see where there are gaps and what must be done to close them so that tech jobs are available to everyone in NYC who wants one.

This report was done by the Center for an Urban Future and was released yesterday. You can read it here.

What the report reveals is that NYC has a rich and expanding ecosystem of tech skills training opportunities, including K-12 and adult education. But, as we all know, the quality is uneven and so are the outcomes.

The report makes twelve recommendations which are detailed here. They are:

1. Make a significant new public investment in expanding and improving New York City’s tech education and training ecosystem. 

2. Set clear and ambitious goals to greatly expand the pipeline of New Yorkers into technology careers. 

3. Prioritize long-term investments in K–12 computing education. 

4. Scale up tech training with a focus on programs that develop in-depth, career-ready skills. 

5. Build the pipeline of educators and facilitators serving both K–12 and career readiness efforts. 

6. Close the geographic gaps in tech education and skills-building programs. 

7. New York City’s tech sector should play a larger role in developing, recruiting, and retaining diverse talent. 

8. Increase access to tech apprenticeships and paid STEM internships through industry partnerships, CS4All, and the city’s current Summer Youth Employment Program. 

9. Expand efforts to market STEM programs to underrepresented students and their families. 

10. Develop and fund links from the numerous computer literacy and basic digital skills-building programs to the in-depth programs that can lead to employment. 

11. Expand the number of bridge programs to provide crucial new on-ramps to further tech education and training for New Yorkers with fundamental skills needs. 

12. Develop major new supports for the non-tuition costs of adult workforce training. 

I participated on the advisory board of this study and support all of these recommendations. Elected officials and policy makers in NYC (and really everywhere) should read and heed these recommendations.

The tech sector faces many headwinds in society right now for a host of reasons. Not all of them can be solved by an employee base that mirrors the planet. But many of them can be and we need to work to get there.

I want to thank the Center For An Urban Future, Tech:NYC, Robin Hood Learning and Technology Fund, Google, Verizon, and Bloomberg LP for giving us a roadmap on how to get there.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Andrew Yang

A VC - February 12, 2020 - 5:41am

I am sorry to see Andrew Yang leave the race for the Democratic nomination last night. He brought a sense of humor, fun, and a ton of new ideas to the slog that is called the primaries. He will be missed. I hope he shows up somewhere else and lends his considerable talents to our nation.

Our portfolio company Recount Media did a really nice tribute to his time in the race and there is a short version of it on YouTube which I’ve embedded below (which won’t come through on email). If you download the Recount mobile app or go to their website you can see the longer version.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

USDC

A VC - February 11, 2020 - 5:01am

I just bought some US Dollars today. I do that many days. But the dollars I bought today are crypto assets, like Bitcoin and Ethereum. These US Dollar assets are called USDC and they are issued by an industry consortium called Centre, led by Circle and our portfolio company Coinbase. I expect many other companies will join the Centre consortium in the coming months and years.

I have been waiting to buy USDC for quite a while. As a NY State resident, I was prohibited from buying them on Coinbase, where I like to buy and hold my crypto assets. I read this morning that the NYS DFS had finally greenlit the sale of USDC to NYS residents and I went to Coinbase and made my purchase.

USDC is a stablecoin, like Tether or Libra. It is designed such that it has a stable value. I bought my USDC tokens for a dollar each this morning. The idea is that I will be able to sell them for a dollar each in an hour, a day, a week, a month, a year, or a decade.

They way Centre does this is they have a reserve. Everybody that spends dollars to buy USDC invests those dollars in the USDC reserve. And so when I want to sell USDC, the reserve is there to supply real dollars to me. The USDC reserve is audited and you can see the audit reports here.

So why would I want crypto dollars vs paper dollars or dollars in a bank account? Well for one, crypto dollars, like other crypto assets, ride on crypto rails. I can send my crypto dollars from my Coinbase wallet to your Coinbase wallet, your Ledger wallet, or many other crypto wallets.

USDC is built on Ethereum and is an ERC-20 token. So it uses crypto standards to ride on these crypto rails.

But more than all of that, USDC are programmable dollars. This is a big deal. Kind of like the difference between an MP3 file and song on a cassette tape. Once an asset is natively digital, without any strings attached, and can be programmed and routed digitally, interesting things happen.

If you have cash balances in your Coinbase account, consider using at least some of them to buy USDC. Then send them around to friends and family. It will feel like using Venmo today. But that is just the start of a lot more to come once programmers start building apps that accept USDC and other crypto assets.

We are emerging from a two year crypto winter right now. Lot’s of interesting things are starting to happen. It’s exciting to see.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Computer Science For All NYC

A VC - February 10, 2020 - 6:14am

About ten years ago, I started asking why were weren’t teaching computer science to every student in the NYC public school system. That led to a journey that started with some computer science high schools and eventually got to a ten year program to get computer science teachers in every school building in NYC and computer science classes for every student. That program is called Computer Science For All and this short three-minute video explains what it is and how it works.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: Squids In Disguise

A VC - February 7, 2020 - 8:00am

Kickstarter CEO Aziz Hasan is running a Make 100 project called Squids In Disguise where he will make 100 surprise sticker packs.

  • 80 packs will contain 5 limited edition art stickers at random from at least 
  • 10 packs will be a special edition of 5 Super Squids (Superhero exclusive)
  • 10 packs will be a special edition of 5 Kickstarter-themed squids

The reference for the artwork will be all nostalgia from my childhood, specifically cartoon and video game characters that I loved growing up, reimagined as squids. 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ahzzzz/squids-in-disguise-limited-edition-art-stickers

I really like it when the CEO of a company uses the product or service publicly. I backed Aziz’s project today.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Tulsi Gabbard calls for reforms of US voting system

Beyond Money - February 6, 2020 - 5:03pm

These measures represent a step toward true democracy and a secure balloting system.

Open Primaries. Transitioning to open primaries in every state, away from our broken and egregiously expensive caucus system, and getting rid of the influence of superdelegates

Same-day Registration. Allowing same-day registration so every person gets to vote, regardless of how they choose to affiliate that election cycle

A paper ballot. Instituting a paper ballot system (or voter-verified paper backup) to keep our elections secure and free of foreign influence

Ranked-choice Voting. Introducing ranked choice voting at the national level, making sure no vote is ever wasted.

Automatic Voter Registration. Ensuring automatic voter registration for every person who turns 18 because there should be very few barriers to participating in democracy.

Make Election Day a Federal Holiday. We should reduce all barriers to performing one of our greatest civic duties.

Who else among the 2020 candidates is calling for such common sense changes? Who else is calling for an end to aggressive US foreign policy and regime-change wars? Who else has experienced first-hand the horrors of combat? Who else has sacrificed the fast-track to the top of the power pyramid in order to serve the common good?
See Tulsi’s website for more details.

Categories: Blog articles

A SEC Safe Harbor For Crypto

A VC - February 6, 2020 - 12:00pm

SEC Commissioner Hester Pierce proposed a “safe harbor” for crypto projects that raise money before they are sufficiently decentralized.

I am a big fan of “safe harbors”and wrote a bit a few years ago about why I like them so much and why a crypto safe harbor is such a needed and good idea.

There is a chicken and egg problem in financing crypto projects. These projects need investment capital and community involvement/buy-in to get to market and begin the process of decentralization. But the SEC views crypto-tokens as securities until the crypto-networks are sufficiently decentralized. And so crypto projects get stuck in this never never land and have to craft crazy frankenstein financings or risk getting sued by the SEC (and/or both) in order to raise money and get their tokens in the hands of community members.

I encourage the SEC to take Commissioner Pierce’s proposal seriously and adopt a workable safe harbor for crypto projects here in the US. We have seen the crypto capital markets and so much of the innovation in the sector move offshore and a safe harbor would be incredibly helpful in getting it back onshore (I couldn’t help the nautical metaphor).


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

The Zoom Room

A VC - February 5, 2020 - 1:00pm

A year and a half ago, I converted my office at USV from a classic office with a desk to a small conference room with a couch, a chair, and a display for videoconferencing. I call it my “zoom room.”

It looks like this.

You can’t see the display because it is on the wall that the couch is facing. But that is my zoom room office at USV.

I like it so much that I have recreated it elsewhere and my friend Brad Feld gave me a tip that I am now using which is to have two displays on the wall, one for the people you are meeting with and one for the presentation material. That is a big improvement to version 1.0 which I have running at USV.

My day is usually all about meetings. I meet with people in conference rooms, I meet with people in my zoom room, and I meet with people on Zoom. So I don’t need a desk and I don’t need a traditional office anymore. The move to this new office model has been very positive for me.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Categories: Blog articles

Creating A Competitive Shaving Market

A VC - February 4, 2020 - 6:57am

The FTC filed a complaint to stop the merger of Edgewell (Schick) and Harry’s yesterday. I don’t have a vested interest in this case in any way (other than having had a summer job working for Gillette in 1980). But it is a very curious action in my view.

Over the last decade, two new competitors have emerged in the shaving market in the US, Harry’s and Dollar Shave. They have brought innovation and competition to a market that has long been dominated by Gillette and Schick.

In 2016, Dollar Shave sold to Unilever, joining Gillette (owned by P&G) in the hands of consumer packaged goods giants.

In May of 2019, Harry’s and Edgewell (Schick) announced their intention to merge and create a strong competitor to Unilever and P&G in the shaving market. As I understand it, the leadership of Harry’s plans take over the Schick brand and bring its marketing and innovation talents to the combined business.

This Recode post on the FTC action has some interesting numbers in it:

According to the research firm Euromonitor, Gillette held 47 percent of the US men’s razor market in 2018, with Edgewell’s brands, which include Schick and Wilkinson Sword, combining for 13.6 percent of the industry. The Harry’s brand, which started selling online but now has a large presence in both Target and Walmart stores, had just a 2.6 percent share at the time, according to Euromonitor. Dollar Shave Club owned 8.5 percent of the US market in 2018, according to Euromonitor, and is owned by Unilever, following a $1 billion acquisition in 2016.

https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/2/3/21120169/harrys-ftc-acquisition-edgewell-schick-gillette-dollar-shave-club

So the FTC thinks that stopping a merger of the number two and four brands in a market is good for competition?

I think it is bad for competition and keeping Harry’s and Schick separated will just allow Unilever and P&G to dominate this market going forward. I don’t understand what the FTC is thinking or doing with this case in the least.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Rebecca Kaden — Feb 7, 2020
A Social Resurgence

Categories: Blog articles

Tech in 2020: Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants

A VC - February 3, 2020 - 7:05am

Our friend Benedict Evans posted his annual “macro trends” deck this weekend.

You can also download the PDF here.

In the deck, Benedict poses the question “what is the next S-Curve?”

And while he doesn’t exactly answer that question, these two slides are revealing:

There is a lot more in the deck, particularly around regulatory issues in tech and it is well worth a quick skim this morning.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Rebecca Kaden — Feb 7, 2020
A Social Resurgence

Gillian Munson — Feb 6, 2020
2020 Analyst Recruiting is Complete!

Categories: Blog articles

The Long Buy

A VC - February 2, 2020 - 8:34am

One of the many things that venture capital has taught me is the value of the long buy.

What I mean by a “long buy” is buying shares in a company over a long period of time. We have investments where we have bought shares seven or eight times over a ten to twelve year period.

There are a bunch of reasons why a long buy is so attractive:

1/ You get to learn more about the opportunity before committing significant funds and each and every subsequent investment is based on a better understanding of the business, the team, the market, the product, etc.

2/ You get to build a blended purchase price which is less dependent on the circumstances of a particular moment in time.

3/ There is often a moment, sometimes several, over the course of a long buy when the company or its market is out of favor, and you can aggressively step up your purchase on more attractive terms than were possible in the first few purchases.

4/ When you own a lot of each and every security (Seed, Series A, Series B, Series C, etc, etc), you are less impacted by the specific terms of any one of the rounds.

There is a special place in the venture capital landscape where this sort of investing is possible and practiced, and that is the traditional early-stage venture capital fund.

Seed funds tend to get tapped out after two or three rounds. And growth funds don’t come into an opportunity until the company has raised three or four rounds. But the traditional early-stage fund can start in the seed round, and keep investing round after round after round until the company no longer needs to raise capital. This is super attractive and not appreciated as much as it should be.

There are not that many asset classes where the manager has a pool of long term locked up capital and the opportunity (and the right) to invest again and again in a company. This combination is possibly the most attractive aspect of the venture capital asset class.

The competition to invest in Seed and Series A rounds is not really about the right to make that initial investment. It is about the right to execute a long buy. And the firms that do that, company after company, fund after fund, are typically the best performing firms in the venture capital business over the long run.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Rebecca Kaden — Feb 7, 2020
A Social Resurgence

Gillian Munson — Feb 6, 2020
2020 Analyst Recruiting is Complete!

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: Walsun Fingerprint Bike Lock

A VC - January 31, 2020 - 7:43am

I don’t usually take a reward when backing a Kickstarter project, but I really need one of these fingerprint bike locks so I did today when I backed it.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — Feb 11, 2020
Birthday Wish: Contributions to Climate Crisis Collective

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Rebecca Kaden — Feb 7, 2020
A Social Resurgence

Gillian Munson — Feb 6, 2020
2020 Analyst Recruiting is Complete!

Categories: Blog articles

You Can’t Fire Your Investor

A VC - January 30, 2020 - 7:30am

I saw this tweet coming out of the Upfront Summit yesterday (where I will be today):

Josh Kopelman of First Round Capital: we can look at every company we’ve ever funded, and learned that the time from first email/contact to term sheet has shrunk from 90 days in 2004 to just 9 today.

— Dan Primack (@danprimack) January 29, 2020

It is great that the capital markets serving founders have become hyperefficient. Being able to get a round done in a week vs a quarter is huge for founders who have better things to do than run around the country talking to VCs.

However, there is a dark side to this trend and that is the reality that shotgun marriages don’t often work out so well. You might be able to get a VC into your cap table in a week but try getting them out. That’s almost impossible.

Which reminds me of this tweet exchange with some friends about the Knicks ownership situation:


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Feb 10, 2020
Proof of Transfer (PoX)

Dani Grant — Feb 10, 2020
Crypto, Social?

Rebecca Kaden — Feb 7, 2020
A Social Resurgence

Albert Wenger — Feb 7, 2020
Coronavirus: Privacy and Democracy

Gillian Munson — Feb 6, 2020
2020 Analyst Recruiting is Complete!

Categories: Blog articles

Site Reliability Issues

A VC - January 29, 2020 - 12:37pm

Since launching AVC 3.0 on January 9th, we have had some site reliability issues.

The most common issue is a “too many redirects” error that has been reported by many people and is intermittent and not easily reproducible. That said, a number of you have been able to create .HAR files and send them to me. Thank you for doing that. Siteground and Cloudflare are now debugging this issue and we hope to have it resolved soon.

I have found that clearing your cache in your browser can help with this issue, but even so, I want to resolve it properly and hope to be able to do so soon.

Last week we had a DDOS attack from China that was caught by Cloudflare and mitigated, but it did result in a short amount of downtime and required blocking several IP addresses at Siteground.

And finally, Siteground had some unplanned downtime this past week as well.

This is not a great way to start out of the gate with a new version of AVC and I am sorry about it.

Those of you who get AVC via email and RSS should not have noticed anything as those services were not impacted to my knowledge.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Rebecca Kaden — Feb 7, 2020
A Social Resurgence

Albert Wenger — Feb 7, 2020
Coronavirus: Privacy and Democracy

Gillian Munson — Feb 6, 2020
2020 Analyst Recruiting is Complete!

Nick Grossman — Feb 3, 2020
The Friendly Wake-up Call

Categories: Blog articles

Justworks

A VC - January 28, 2020 - 9:58am

I just posted about USV’s investment in Justworks on the USV blog.

I have known Isaac Oates for over a decade and he’s a terrific entrepreneur and has built a great company which offers a fantastic HR solution to small and mid sized companies.

If you don’t love the payroll and benefits solution your company uses, go here and find out how Justworks can change that for you and your employees.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Gillian Munson — Feb 6, 2020
2020 Analyst Recruiting is Complete!

Nick Grossman — Feb 3, 2020
The Friendly Wake-up Call

Bethany Crystal — Jan 30, 2020
What We Can Learn from Works in Progress

Albert Wenger — Jan 29, 2020
Support Andrew Yang

Dani Grant — Jan 29, 2020
Consumer Crypto Product Ideas

Categories: Blog articles

Billie Eilish

A VC - January 27, 2020 - 7:20am

It was nice to see Billie Eilish and her brother Finneas O’Connell run the table on the Grammy’s last night. It was yet another sign that the age of self made artists is upon us.

As is our custom, my partner Andy and our friend Whitney posted some music to Twitter today. Andy and I went with Billie Eilish.

it's fun to go back and listen to her early stuff on SoundCloud. https://t.co/auxqxaO2sd so nice to see her and her brother get the props they deserve.

— Fred Wilson (@fredwilson) January 27, 2020

Which led to this response by Arnold:

i like to believe that great art and great artists have the tools today to bypass that top driven industry and be heard on their own terms.

— Fred Wilson (@fredwilson) January 27, 2020

The music industry remains vital and is enjoying a financial renaissance as streaming platforms provide a massive earnings stream for the industry.

But underneath all of that is the fact that great art and great artists now have a much easier time finding their audience and being discovered. And that’s a great thing, just like Billie’s music .


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Feb 3, 2020
The Friendly Wake-up Call

Bethany Crystal — Jan 30, 2020
What We Can Learn from Works in Progress

Albert Wenger — Jan 29, 2020
Support Andrew Yang

Dani Grant — Jan 29, 2020
Consumer Crypto Product Ideas

Categories: Blog articles

The Exchange Revolution

Beyond Money - January 26, 2020 - 5:33pm

In November of 2009, I gave a presentation at the conference on Michigan’s Future Energy, Economy & Environment, at Crystal Mountain Resort in Thompsonville, Michigan. More than 10 years later, this presentation is still timely.

Ken Freeman has recently augmented and adapted recordings of that presentation to produce this new video, titled, Exchange Revolution, which has now been posted on our Beyond Money Podcast site. It is a comprehensive description of the what and how of transcending the political fiat money regime, and building a new equitable system of value exchange.

It can also be found on YouTube at https://youtu.be/MvTMcvVzNuQ. The transcript can be found here.

 

Categories: Blog articles
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