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Doing The Heavy Lifting

A VC - 16 hours 44 min ago

Most venture capital investments are made, over time, by syndicates. This means a group of venture capital firms develops around a company, usually built over multiples rounds. Some of the firms in the syndicate agree to (or require) having a partner from their firm join the Board of the company.

If you look at the roughly dozen boards I am on, most of them have multiple venture capitalists on them. Some also have independent directors, something I believe strongly in and have written about frequently.

Not all venture capital firms in your syndicate will be the same. Not all of the VCs on your board will be the same. Some will be challenging to deal with. Some will be unproductive and distracting. Some will be nice to have around but won’t do much. A few will roll up the sleeves and do the “heavy lifting.”

It is this latter group that is super valuable. You saw it in action last week when the partners of Benchmark apparently negotiated a change in leadership at Uber. That is hard, painful work. But someone has to do it. And I have seen the partners at Benchmark do it before. They don’t shy from the tough stuff. Nobody enjoys doing things like that, but they know when it is needed and they step up and do it.

I was talking to another VC I work with yesterday about a completely different situation. The company is doing great. We have some important decisions in front of us, all good choices to have to make, but selecting the right ones will matter a lot. This VC has been deeply engaged in the process, providing a lot of super valuable advice, and saying things that need to be said, even if they are not popular. I feel incredibly lucky to have someone like that in a syndicate with me. And I told him that yesterday.

You can put together a list of the top VCs by returns. That is done annually. It’s all nonsense. There are a ton of shitty VCs on that list. Returns matter, for sure. But what really matters is who shows up when the hard conversation has to be had. What really matters is who provides the right advice at a critical time. What really matters is who puts aside their own personal interests and does what is in the best interests of the company. What really matters is who steps into a vacuum and provides leadership when it is badly needed.

When you are picking investors, you should call around and check references. Ask about this stuff. Find out who does the heavy lifting and who goes along for the ride. Pick the one who does the heavy lifting. Because you will need it, frequently.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

The war against cash continues apace

Beyond Money - June 24, 2017 - 5:36am

Thanks to Michael Nevradakis for his excellent article, How Greece Became A Guinea Pig For A Cashless And Controlled Society, that recently appeared in Mint Press News.

The world has long been heading toward a neo-feudal world order headed by a global elite that uses its control of money, banking and finance to fleece and disempower the masses. Georgetown Professor and Bill Clinton’s mentor Carroll Quigley, told us 50 years ago that:
“The powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world’s central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank . . . sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world.”
––Prof. Carroll Quigley, Georgetown historian, mentor of former President Clinton, and author of Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time, 1966, p. 324.

To anyone who cares to look, it is clear to see how that precise agenda has been playing out over the past several decades, and what the end state will be. The war against cash is a logical next step in achieving the plan that Quigley outlined. I strongly urge the reader to study Nevradakis’ entire article here.


Categories: Blog articles

Video Of The Week: Unpacking Initial Coin Offerings (ICO) and Token Sales

A VC - June 23, 2017 - 10:29pm

It’s a travel day for me. We are flying back home today after four weeks away.

William told me to watch this video about ICOs and Token Sales. So I will do that on the flight home. Maybe you all might like to watch it too.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Democratizing capitalism

Beyond Money - June 23, 2017 - 3:16am

Cutting Edge Capital’s Vice-President Brian Beckon provides a crash course on investing and community development, and describes how ordinary people can invest some of their savings in local profit-making ventures that conform to their values. The strategies being worked out by his firm are aimed at creating healthier, more resilient and self-reliant communities while enabling small investors to earn a share of the profits generated by businesses that they believe in and wish to support. Approaches like these are essential to building a more democratic and equitable economy. Listen here.


Categories: Blog articles

Fun Friday: Let’s Play GM

A VC - June 23, 2017 - 2:57am

So you are Phil Jackson and you’ve got the eighth pick in yesterday’s NBA Draft. 

You want a guard who can be a franchise player for the Knicks.

You can take Malik Monk, Dennis Smith Jr, or Frank Ntilikina.

Who do you pick?

I don’t know much about Frank Ntilikina. I sure hope he lives up to whatever Phil Jackson saw in him. 

But I fell in love with Malik Monk’s game in the NCAA tournament. He’d have been my pick.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Numeraire Is Live

A VC - June 22, 2017 - 1:26am

Back in February, I posted about Numeraire.

I wrote:

the Numerai team has now gone a step further and issued a crypto-token called Numeraire to incent these data scientists to work together to build the best models instead of just competing with each other

And roughy four months later, I am happy to write that the Numeraire token is live on the Ethereum blockchain.

You can read more about this here.

Well done Numerai team.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Open Source Funding Documents

A VC - June 21, 2017 - 1:35am

Cooley, one of the top startup law firms, has open sourced the legal documents required to do a Series Seed or Convertible Note financing.

They are available on Cooley’s CooleyGo document generation platform and also on GitHub.

Kudos to Cooley for doing this. We need to make the transaction costs of getting a financing done as low as possible and putting the legal docs into the public domain is a great step forward in doing that.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Thirty Years

A VC - June 19, 2017 - 8:08pm

Thirty years ago today the Gotham Gal and I were married. It was a very warm and humid day in the Washington DC area and the skies opened up and poured during the wedding ceremony which was happily inside. After that, the humidity cleared and the sun came out and it turned into a beautiful evening. That was a good omen and while our marriage has had a few thunderstorms, it has mostly been sunny skies.

We’ve known each other since we were nineteen and have lived together since we were twenty. We moved to NYC at twenty-one without a dime to our names and the first bank account we opened was a joint account. Everything we’ve accomplished over the years has been our collective success and there have been many successes and plenty of failures too.

Our three amazing children are our greatest success and our greatest joy. We also love NYC, LA, Amagansett, Paris, Park City, art, food, and entrepreneurs, not in any particular order.

Thirty years of marriage feels substantial. It’s not yet a lifetime together but we are getting there now. And it feels great. There is no greater feeling in life than to love and be loved and I feel bathed in it today and every day.

To celebrate this milestone, we took off four weeks from memorial day weekend through this coming weekend. I like to call it a victory lap. While we haven’t avoided work entirely, we have cut back on it dramatically. And today, we won’t work at all. We plan to spend the day together in Paris enjoying each other and everything this wonderful city has to offer.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Paris

A VC - June 19, 2017 - 1:16am

The Gotham Gal and I have been coming to Paris for close to thirty years. We started coming with our family a little more than fifteen years ago and spent one summer here as a family about ten years ago. We bought an apartment here around five years ago and we try to be here two to four weeks a year. Needless to say, we love Paris.

We have been in Paris three times in the past month and just arrived back yesterday. Every time I arrive here I marvel at the beauty of the city. It’s not just the architecture and scale (no skyscrapers) and light, all of which contribute to the beauty of Paris, it is the people, the stores, the sidewalk cafes, the parks, and much more. I have been to hundreds of cities around the world and I have never been to a city as beautiful as Paris.

I have noticed a lot of changes in Paris over the years we have been coming. The Parisians are much more tolerant of English and English speakers these days. Their English is generally better than my French. 

Paris has always had great transportation with it’s amazing Metro system, and the best thing to do in Paris is walk, but Velib and a host of ride sharing apps have made getting around even eaiser.

Paris continues to reinvent itself. There are new neighborhoods to explore, new shops to buy from, and new restaurants that continue to push the cuisine forward. That is not true of many cities in Europe these days and is a testament to the city and its citizens.

The new French leader Emmanuel Macron wants France to act like a startup. From what I see in Paris these days, that is already happening although leadership at the top can and will certainly help.

And speaking of startups, there are plenty of good ones in France and specifically in Paris. We have one of them, LaRuche, in our portfolio and I know of many great entrepreneurs, startups, and VCs in Paris.

I also know of a few big tech companies in the Bay Area that are eyeing Paris for a remote engineering location. The French have a great education system and produce a lot of engineers. It makes a lot of sense that companies looking to access new talent pools would come here.

There are, of course, challenges doing business in France. It’s hard to rapidly scale up and down your workforces here. The labor laws are challenging for high growth volatile companies to deal with. And it’s too complicated to conclude financings quickly in France (and Germany and other European countries). Macron and his team would be wise to move these laws closer to the US model.

But all in all, Paris is a thriving, bustling, innovative place that is lovely to be in and I am very bullish on it and the new French leadership.

Here’s a photo I took on our walk home from dinner last night along the river that captures what a lovely place Paris is.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Should Your Company Be Profitable?

A VC - June 17, 2017 - 11:36pm

Mark Suster just put up a long post on this topic. His message is “it depends” and he explains the rationale for investing in growth vs getting profitable.

I have come to think about this differently.

If you are bootstrapping your company without the help of outside investment (ie angels, VCs, etc), then you have to be profitable from day one. No debate or discussion there.

But if you have the ability to lose money because of the availability of outside investment, then you can and should lose money in the first three stages of your company’s development which are; 1) building the product, 2) shipping the product, 3) scaling the revenues. But once you have achieved those three objectives, I believe you should move on to #4 – getting profitable.

There is this idea that you can’t grow really fast and be profitable at the same time. There is also this idea that you have to keep adding engineering and product resources as you scale your business. And there is this idea that more salespeople equals more sales. I have found that all three of those ideas are wrong to some extent. And I have found that really strong execution in product, engineering, and sales, based on doing less, not more, and based on having a high performing team without a lot of baggage, will allow your company to grow fast and be profitable at the same time.

We have a number of portfolio companies that are now seven, eight, nine, and ten years old that for most of their lives have been unprofitable and focused on growing users, revenues, and the team. I have been working closely with a few of them in the last year or two to help them to change their mindset to get profitable. This has, in some cases, meant reducing the size of the team, in a few cases significantly.

It has been enlightening to watch what has happened with this cohort of companies. They have kept growing, sometimes at a higher growth rate than before the belt tightening. They are better places to work, more stable, more focused, and more successful. They are better companies and they are more valuable companies. They are easier to finance and they are easier to exit.

I would encourage all entrepreneurs and leaders out there to embrace the idea of getting profitable sooner than you might think you can or should. It’s good for your companies and it is good for you.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Video Of The Week: Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Report

A VC - June 16, 2017 - 11:56pm

This is a few weeks old, but I finally got around to watching it.

Mary always does a nice job of summarizing the latest trends.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: Space Odyssey – The Video Game

A VC - June 15, 2017 - 11:51pm

Here’s an awesome Kickstarter project. I just backed it. You can collaborate with renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson to make a Space Odyssey video game.

Here is the video:

And here is the project if you’d like to back it.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 24, 2017
The joy of fixing things up

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Creative Missions For Drone Pilots

A VC - June 14, 2017 - 11:50pm

Our portfolio company Dronebase announced something interesting and fun this week. They have partnered with Getty Images to provide opportunities for drone pilots to fly “creative missions”:

Before today, DroneBase pilots had access to just two types of missions: client missions and panomissions,  both of which have unique photography specifications. Today, we’re excited to introduce Getty Creative Missions as a third opportunity for our pilot community.

For the first time ever, drone pilots have an opportunity to flex their creative muscles for a chance to have their work to be featured on Getty Images for purchase.

If you are a drone pilot, amateur or pro, and want to fly these creative missions and sell your work via Getty, download the Dronebase iPhone App or log into their website and follow the “Get On Getty” links.

To kick off this partnership, Getty and Dronebase are running a campaign called Cityscapes:

We’re excited to kick off our Getty partnership with a “Cityscapes” theme, a call for the best metropolitan aerial submissions from around the world.

So if you are a drone pilot and live or work in or near a city, take your drone out and capture some amazing cityscapes and submit them to Dronebase. They may end up on Getty Images and start earning you money.

There are a lot of things that excite me about this partnership, but maybe the biggest thing for me is how it reveals the core mission of Dronebase which is to give drone pilots lots of fun and rewarding things to do with their drones. And this is just the beginning. If you have a drone and want to do more with it, get the iPhone app or join via their website and start doing fun and rewarding missions with Dronebase.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — June 24, 2017
Health Insurance and the R Word (Redistribution)

Categories: Blog articles

Buyer Beware

A VC - June 13, 2017 - 10:33pm

I got this question on Twitter yesterday:

Are there any parallels you can draw between ICOs and private investment rounds?

— Daniel Olshansky (@olshansky) June 13, 2017

And I responded with this:

Yes, buyer beware. Do your homework. Don’t be greedy.

— Fred Wilson (@fredwilson) June 14, 2017

I could say a lot more and so I will.

Whether you are buying in a private placement of securities as a venture capitalist or buying in an ICO as a crypto enthusiast, there are certain things that you need to be careful about. And right now, with all of the enthusiasm for crypto assets out there, I am very concerned that nobody is being careful about anything.

So here are some things to think about before placing your order on that next ICO:

  1. The amount raised matters, a lot. More money is not generally a good thing. I wrote a blog post about this a while back. In my experience, the startups that are careful and raise modest amounts of capital outperform the startups that raise crazy amounts of capital and are overly aggressive. I would look for capped ICOs and modest amounts of capital. Teams should raise enough money to do what they want to do but you can do a lot with $10mm and a tremendous amount with $50mm. Ethereum raised $18.5mm USD (in BTC) in their token offering and lost some of that due to a decline in BTC value. And look at what they have been able to accomplish with that funding.
  2. You should understand what the token that is being offered does and have some feel for how large of an opportunity that is. I remember friends buying hot Internet IPOs in the late 90s and I’d ask them why they were investing and they would say to me “I heard its a hot deal” and I would say “But what does the company do?” and they would say to me “I don’t know, but I know I’m going to make a lot of money.” That kind of investing is dumb. Be smart and understand what you are buying and why. And if you can’t hold the investment through to the point at which the token will have real utility and real value, you might want to think twice about buying it in the first place.
  3. Valuation matters. I know that many in startup land don’t really agree with this. There are VCs who want to be in the best deals and don’t really care what they have to pay to get into them. That might work as an investment strategy but it requires a lot of luck and market timing. If, instead, you focus on valuation when you make your investments and buy into investments at prices that make sense to you and have a model for why and how the investment will be worth 10x your entry price in 5+ years, you stand a much better chance at making solid returns. There are people in the crypto space who are building valuation models. You should follow them and understand their work. And you should try to apply that kind of thinking to your crypto investing.
  4. Avoid scams and things that feel like scams. Scams are not limited to the crypto sector. They exist in all forms of investing (and many other sectors too). As VCs we often get pitched an opportunity that has red flags all over it. You learn quickly to delete those emails and not return those calls. But an emerging sector, like crypto, where there is less regulation, scrutiny, due diligence, and knowledge, scams are going to be more common. There have already been a bunch of well publicized scams in the crypto sector and I would bet that one or more successfully funded ICOs that have already been done will turn out to have been a scam in some measure. There is a difference between a intentional scam and an accidental scam, but if you are the investor, you were scammed in both instances. Be on the lookout for scams and avoid them. The best red flag for a scam is lack of detail on the technology, how it will work, and a lack of credibility of the people behind the project. Do you homework on these investments and make sure the technology and the people are credible before you part with your money.
  5. Look for projects where the technology is well specified and is working in the wild. It is much easier as a VC to invest in companies where the product has been shipped and you can use it. I would venture to guess that more than 80% of USV’s investments over the years have been into companies where that was the case. You can use Bitcoin, you can use Ethereum, you can use Steem, you can use Zcash. These are fully functioning crypto assets that have been “shipped” and are widely used. That does not mean they will be successful, but it sure gives you more confidence that they might be successful. Investing on a white paper is way more risky than investing in a working technology that you can use yourself.
  6. Don’t be greedy. This goes for both buyers and sellers in the market. You might be able to make a killing right now. But I would suggest you resist that urge. Those who play this market right over the long term will do extremely well. But trying to make a killing overnight is always a bad idea. So for sellers that means raising reasonable amounts, not all you can get. And selling more into the market over time, as Vitalik suggests in this blog post:
    If we want to strike at the heart of this problem, how would we solve it? I would say the answer is simple: start moving to mechanisms other than single round sales. For the buyers, this means not putting all of your assets to work in one ICO, or even all of your assets into crypto. Markets can crash. You need diversification to manage risk, particularly in highly volatile markets.

I have been a big booster of Bitcoin, blockchain, crypto tokens, and the like on this blog for the past six years. I am a big long term believer in this sector. USV is investing in this sector. We are investors in token funds and I believe we will start directly buying tokens soon. So we are bullish on crypto.

However, there are many things going on in the sector right now that are head shakers to us. We have been investing in startups and emerging tech sectors for over thirty years. We have seen this movie before . We know how it plays out and we know that all is not up and to the right forever.

When people are afraid, be greedy. And when people are greedy, be afraid. We are much closer to the latter scenario in crypto right now and while I am not afraid for my investments and USV’s investments in this sector, I am afraid for the sector and those who are being the most greedy right now. I am cautioning our portfolio companies to tread carefully and we are treading carefully. And I would advise all of you to do the same.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — June 22, 2017
Getting in over your head

Albert Wenger — June 21, 2017
Uncertainty Wednesday: Random Variables

Categories: Blog articles

Warriors, Come Out And Play

A VC - June 13, 2017 - 12:29am

That’s a line from one of my favorite films, The Warriors.

But this post is not about those Warriors.

It is about the Golden State Warriors.

Who are now the world champions for the second time in three years and did it impressively in five games.

Like most of this NBA season, it wasn’t even close.

The Warriors, with the addition of KD, have assembled a dynasty, if they can stay healthy and keep the core together. Steph, KD, Draymond, and Klay are four of the best twenty players in the league and they are all on the same team.

This dynasty could go on for a while unless some other team can match it. Maybe the Spurs if they get CP3? Or maybe the Celtics or the Sixers if they can assemble some terrific young talent?

But those are big maybes.

We may have to get used to seeing these players with the trophy in their hands for a while.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — June 21, 2017
Uncertainty Wednesday: Random Variables

Albert Wenger — June 20, 2017
MongoDB Stitch: A Fresh Take on Backend As A Service

Categories: Blog articles

Inflation/Deflation In Tokens

A VC - June 12, 2017 - 1:30am

I remember back in 2011 when I first learned about Bitcoin, we started talking about the technology and the model internally at USV. My partner Albert had done a lot of reading about it and he raised the 21mm hard cap as something that had both pros and cons associated with it.

Ever since then I’ve been mindful of that when looking at the design of various crytpo currencies. Most have a hard cap or some small inflationary model (like ETH).

Yesterday Albert wrote a blog post explaining some of the issues that hard caps create for crytpocurrencies.

In his post, Albert explains that the hard cap approach:

 

results in extremely rapid appreciation of tokens well ahead of their use value.

We are certainly seeing that at play right now with the rapid price escalation across the crypto landscape. Of course, some of that is the speculative fever that has invaded the sector.

But it may also be related to the inherent monetary policy that most teams are choosing for their tokens. And so I think it’s a good thing to have this discussion and think about whether a hard cap is a feature or a bug.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — June 21, 2017
Uncertainty Wednesday: Random Variables

Albert Wenger — June 20, 2017
MongoDB Stitch: A Fresh Take on Backend As A Service

Categories: Blog articles

Greece workshop starts Friday

Beyond Money - June 11, 2017 - 10:12am

The start of our workshop, Monetary and Financial Innovation for the New Economy, is just a few days away but there is still space available and enough time to make travel arrangements. Here are some additional details about what you can expect from the experience.

The workshop leader will provide enough structure to focus attention and direct the inquiry but leave room for creativity, individual research, and the spontaneous emergence of innovative designs, plans, and implementation strategies. That structure will include:

  • The fundamental concepts upon which the exchange process and capital formation are based.
  • Critical examination of present and past alternatives.
  • The various aspects that must be addressed in design and deployment of exchange and finance innovations.

Everyone will play an active role in an intensive process of inquiry, discovery, sharing and collaboration aimed at:

  1. achieving a deeper understanding of the principles of currency, credit, finance, and the exchange process, and,
  2. developing action plans for the design and deployment of robust systems that can be widely proliferated and quickly scaled up to global dimensions.
  3. assembling a knowledge base that can provide guidance toward achieving more equitable and sustainable structures for value exchange and finance.

As the week progresses, teams may be formed to dig deeper into particular aspects of design and implementation and to develop action plans. Besides Exchange and Finance, the realms of our inquiry will include Change, Innovation, Processes, Systems, and Networks.

Depending on the needs and interests of the participants, the focus of our attention will be on definitions and principles related to some of the following topics:

  1. The essence and role of money
  2. Banking
  3. Reciprocal Exchange
  4. Liquidity
  5. Monetization
  6. Basis of issue, backing, and
  7. Credit
  8. Alternative currency models
  9. Credit clearing and “offset”
  10. Value measurement and units of account
  11. Saving and investment; value storage and capital formation
  12. Intermediation and disintermediation
  13. Usury and interest
  14. Demurrage
  15. Inflation, deflation, and currency debasement
  16. Depressions. The nature and causes of economic depressions.
  17. Exchange Networks
  18. Inter-trading across trade exchanges; Balance of payments/trade.
  19. Broader implications of innovative exchange mechanisms.
  20. Implementation and proliferation of innovative exchange mechanism.

And, there will be plenty of time to enjoy the beach and Greek village life.

Further details and booking are at http://www.kalikalos.com/community/x/exchange-finance-new-economy-thomas-greco/

If finances are a problem, application for discounts may be made by writing to Rachel Davson at rachaeldavson@gmail.com.

Looking forward to working with you,

Thomas


Categories: Blog articles

Monthly Match Wrap-Up

A VC - June 11, 2017 - 1:53am

I woke up Sunday morning in Europe to the news that our monthly match campaign for The Human Utility had crossed the $20k mark and thus our $20k match was fully funded. That was great news but then I saw this tweet from Tiffani, the founder of The Human Utility:

So now @fredwilson @thegothamgal @bfeld + @abatchelor will 2x it. @jesslivingston will 3x it.

Internet teamwork makes the dream work!

Categories: Blog articles

Video Of The Week: Detroit Water Project/The Human Utility

A VC - June 10, 2017 - 3:26am

We are in the midst of a monthly match campaign for The Human Utility which used to be called Detroit Water Project.

The founder of this effort, Tiffani Bell, explains the story of how this project came to be in this eight minute video;

If you want to participate in our match campaign after watching the video you can do so here.

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: The Human Utility Monthly Match

A VC - June 8, 2017 - 11:04pm

And we are back with this month’s matching campaign to support a good cause.

We are moving away from the big well known causes to some lesser known but important efforts to help people who need our help.

We are going to start with helping people in need pay their water bills and keep clean water flowing to their homes.

The Human Utility helps almost 1000 families in Detroit and Baltimore pay their water bills and avoid a water shutoff.

We are going to match the first $20k of donations that anyone makes to The Human Utility between now and Sunday night (midnight PST). If we fully utilize this match, we will raise $40k which might get another 100 families their water back. That would be awesome.

To donate and have your contribution matched, go here and hit the big blue Donate button and make sure to tweet out your donation so we can match it.

Let’s get some water flowing again.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Albert Wenger — June 17, 2017
Getting Past the Dominance of the Nation State

Categories: Blog articles
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