Blog articles

New Podcast Episode 10 – Todd Boyle

Beyond Money - August 9, 2020 - 5:55pm

Episode 10    A conversation with Todd Boyle

ToddBoyleTodd Boyle is a man with a very interesting and unusual life story. In this podcast episode, he candidly tells us about how he grew up in a large Catholic family; served a brief stint in the US navy but didn’t like it and managed to get discharged; got involved for a time in the drug scene; went to college and then worked for many years as a successful certified public accountant. He eventually renounced that career in favor of fulltime activism to promote the causes of peace and justice. He has been a staunch opponent of the war in Afghanistan and the multiple covert and violent interventions by US forces in countries around the world, and in recent years he has been a tireless advocate for the homeless right here in America. Todd’s ideas for ending homelessness, and 50 IDEAS for Cheaper Housing are listed here.

Listen in as we discuss some of the main contemporary issues and Todd’s ideas about how to get through the present deepening crisis with his own version of “walking away.”

Todd is active on Facebook where he says he has been “hanging out 4 or 5 hours a day for the last 15 years.” You can follow him there.

 

https://beyondmoney.files.wordpress.com/2020/08/todd-f-boyle-2020-08-01_final.mp3
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Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: Jelly2

A VC - August 7, 2020 - 4:08am

I’ve written about the need for smaller form factor smartphones and know a bunch of people who are frustrated by the lack of choice in small form factor smartphones.

So I was interested to see this Kickstarter project to bring to market a 3″ Android smartphone that sells for sub $200.

Not everyone wants or needs a credit card sized smartphone, but those that do benefit from Android being open and platforms like Kickstarter that make niche products viable for creators.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Matt Cynamon — Aug 13, 2020
A Quick Update On Hiring

Albert Wenger — Aug 13, 2020
Marxism Remains a Dangerous Idea

Categories: Blog articles

RIP John Papworth

Beyond Money - August 6, 2020 - 4:57pm

JPapworthCameoOne of the saddest things about getting old is seeing the departure of one’s friends and family. Most recently for me, it was the passing, at age 98, of long-time friend and colleague John Papworth. John, an ordained Anglican priest, was a staunch advocate for peace and indefatigable proponent of community empowerment and human scale.

As I recall, I first became aware of John and his work in the early 1980s through my association with the School of Living, then a bit later we met face to face on one of his tours of the United States when he came to Rochester to meet with a group of us who worked with the Peace and Justice Education Center. John, at the time was publishing The Fourth World Review, a periodical that promoted decentralism and the idea that the gigantic size of nation states, mass media, and allied institutions makes democratic government and world peace unattainable. John argued that, “The way forward is not through mass party machines, but through the development of local community governing powers to a maximum level to ensure we have government not from the top down but as much as possible from the base up, A Fourth World of peoples’ power.”

“Villages and small communities are the bloodcells of civilisation, if they are free and fully empowered they can yet halt the current Gadarene rush to collapse and enable civilisation to flourish in peace and plenty and a splendour to match the achievements of the human-scale world of the Renaissance.”

Searching the Web today, you’ll not find much about it, but I consider John’s Fourth World Review and Fourth World Assemblies to 4thWorldList pdfhave been extremely important elements in the ongoing efforts toward community empowerment and a new, more peaceful society. In 1986 I travelled to Zurich, Switzerland to participate in the 5th Assembly of the Fourth World, and then took it upon myself to organize the 6th Assembly of the Fourth World in San Francisco the following year. Under the aegis of the School of Living of which I then served as President, together with affiliated groups, the next three annual Assemblies were held in Raleigh, Toronto, and Dallas, respectively.

I did find a post about the Fourth World Review on the website of the UK National Liberal Party at http://nationalliberal.org/liberty-wall-3/fourth-world-review, from which the above quotes were taken. That post also contains links to two issues of The Fourth World Review (#153, winter 2011: click here, and #154, spring 2012: click here) that were published under the new editorship of Wayne John Sturgeon and Graham Williamson after John stepped aside. I’ve found no evidence of its continued publication after that.

In this photo below, taken in September 2001 at Papworth’s home in Purton, England, I am with John P. (center) and self-sufficiency advocate and prolific writer, John Seymour (right). At that time, Donna, my then partner and I, were there to participate in the Radical Consultation, a Fourth World event that was held in nearby Swindon. As it turned out, we were staying with John at his home on the very day that the World Trade Center in New York was attacked and destroyed. After John’s son Pierre phoned to alert us to what was happening, we watched on the tele, as did millions of others, the unfolding horrors of that day.

THG_JP_JS_2001Cr

You can find John’s obituaries in The Times of London, the Telegraph, and the Church Times.

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Categories: Blog articles

NBA Top Shot

A VC - August 6, 2020 - 8:00am

One of the questions I hear on crypto is “what can I do with it besides trade it?” And that’s a good question because truth be told, there have not been great use cases for crypto other than storing value, sending value, and speculating.

But that is changing, as I mentioned in this blog post last week.

One thing you can do with crypto is make digital assets scarce. Bitcoin is scarce. There will be only 21mm Bitcoins. And Bitcoin is a digital asset.

So using the same technology, you can make any digital asset scarce.

And that’s a big deal. Ever since media went digital (mp3s, jpegs, movs, etc), media creators have been trying to figure out how to put the genie back in the bottle and largely failing. But if you create a crypto-asset, you can make it scarce.

Our portfolio company Dapper Labs has been working with the NBA and the NBA Players Association over the last year to create digital trading cards that are scarce. These digital playing cards are being made available via a game called NBA Top Shot. NBA Top Shot is invite only right now but if you read on, you will be given an opportunity to get an invite.

I’ve been playing NBA Top Shot for about a month now. I have bought something like 5 or 6 “packs” which contain a bunch of cards. When you buy a pack, you don’t know what cards you will get. Opening them is a lot of fun. Players are posting their pack openings on YouTube. Here is one of those videos:

Here is my collection of cards (sorry for the messed up formatting, I had to shrink my screen to get them all):

As you can see, I have put two of my cards up for sale in the NBA Top Shot marketplace. Like a good Knicks fan, I have to trade KP away. I’m only asking $25 for that card.

There is a lot more coming in this game, but for now the game play is buying, opening, collecting, and trading. And it is a lot of fun.

If you want to check it out, here’s a typeform where you can enter your email address and answer one quick question and then you will get an invite. I encourage you to buy my Joe Harris and KP cards so I can turn around and buy RJ Barrett and Julius Randle in the marketplace.

I encourage everyone to check out NBA Top Shot. For one, it is a lot of fun. And it also reveals something important about crypto and how it can and will change videogames, collectibles, and other sectors by making digital/virtual goods scarce and collectible.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Matt Cynamon — Aug 13, 2020
A Quick Update On Hiring

Albert Wenger — Aug 13, 2020
Marxism Remains a Dangerous Idea

Categories: Blog articles

Independent Director Compensation

A VC - August 5, 2020 - 5:55am

I got this question yesterday and answered via email and thought I’d share that discussion with all of you:

I enjoyed your article on Board Diversity (https://avc.com/2020/06/board-diversity/ ) and am planning to implement it at my company. I was hoping to get some guidance on the following:

* How would you define the role of the independent director / what is their job? 

* How would you compensate them for this job? 

I believe the role of the independent directors is to represent “the Company” in all board discussions. Founders and investors can and do think about what is best for the Company, but they also think about what is best for them. An independent director can and should represent the Company in Board discussions. Also, an independent director should have experience operating a business and should actively share that experience with the leadership team.

For compensation, I like the use an annual amount of $100,000. That is substantially less than public company directors make (which is more like $200,000 per year), but being a public company director is more time consuming and exposes a director to more liability. So I feel like $100,000 a year is reasonable compensation for a private company director. The spread between private company board compensation and public company board compensation narrows as a Company gets closer to being public.

Private company directors are usually compensated in stock, not cash.

I like to use the following approach for stock based compensation:

  • For companies valued below $40mm enterprise value, pay an independent director 0.25% of the Company per year served on the Board.
  • For companies valued above $40mm of enterprise value, pay an independent director a percentage of the Company per year served equal to ($100k/enterprise valuation). For example, if your Company is worth $100mm, then you would pay 0.1% per year served ($100k/$100mm).
  • It is typical to make a “front-loaded” grant of four years of value and vest it over four years. So in this second example, where the Company is worth $100mm, the independent director would be granted an option for 0.4% of the Company, worth $400k, and vest that over four years.
  • However, for very early stage companies where the annual grants are quite large (0.25% per year), it is more common to make those grants annually so that the dilution from these grants comes down as the Company’s value increases. That said, front-loaded four-year grants are made for directors of early-stage companies as well.

As I said in the blog post on Board Diversity linked to above, I believe getting independent directors on your board from the very start is a good move. It will make your Board meetings better and it will make your Company better. And make sure to strongly consider diverse candidates when you add independent directors to your Board.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Matt Cynamon — Aug 13, 2020
A Quick Update On Hiring

Albert Wenger — Aug 13, 2020
Marxism Remains a Dangerous Idea

Categories: Blog articles

Instant Covid Tests

A VC - August 4, 2020 - 5:18am

We are now approaching five months into the Covid pandemic in the US. The world is more like six or seven months in. And while we wait for vaccines and/or therapeutics to end it, we are left with social distancing, mask wearing, testing, and tracing. These tools can and do work well if used rigorously and ubiquitously.

As we prepare to return to NYC in the fall, I am curious about the state of small and portable diagnostic technologies that can deliver an accurate and “real time” result cost effectively. I am thinking of something like a pregnancy test.

There are many things that would benefit from such tests. Schools could be more agressive about re-opening if everyone (teachers and students and staff) could be tested every morning on the way in the door. Offices could re-open too. So could stores and other local businesses.

And it would be easier to go see friends and family if you arrive at their front door with a test in hand and get a negative result before walking in the door.

I know that there are a number of companies working on such tests. What I don’t know is the status of these efforts, how soon they can come to market, and what they will cost. The less expensive the better obviously.

If you know anything about these technologies, please hit the “Discuss On Twitter” button below and share it with all of us. If you want to see what has been shared, hit the “View Discussions” button. If you are reading via email, go here to see these buttons and hit them.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Matt Cynamon — Aug 13, 2020
A Quick Update On Hiring

Albert Wenger — Aug 13, 2020
Marxism Remains a Dangerous Idea

Categories: Blog articles

The Dog Days Of Summer

A VC - August 3, 2020 - 4:50am

We are officially in the dog days of summer when vacations and the heat and humidity cause things to slow down.

It used to be true that companies would put financing efforts on hold in late July and August and return to “the market” after labor day.

In recent years, that summer slowdown has not happened as much and we have advised our portfolio companies to keep raising during the summer doldrums.

This year will be interesting as many founders and investors have been working remotely for five months now. Will that change anything this summer?

It is possible that everyone needs a break and things will slow down this month. But I kind of doubt it. This has been a crazy and unpredictable year but the one thing that has been true throughout the year is that the capital markets are working overtime and I suspect that will be true during the dog days of summer too.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Matt Cynamon — Aug 13, 2020
A Quick Update On Hiring

Albert Wenger — Aug 13, 2020
Marxism Remains a Dangerous Idea

Categories: Blog articles

Walking Away: From the “New (Old) World Order,” into the Old (New) World Order. Part II

Beyond Money - August 1, 2020 - 6:30pm

ConfusedDirections

Discord and confusion, conflicting stories, rampant disinformation, faction against faction,  widespread anger and fear, people fighting among themselves, economic dislocation, personal interactions disrupted and people separated from friends and family, cessation of favorite sports and pastimes, and widespread abandonment of familiar ways of doing things. That is the state of our world today.

How have we come to this sorry pass and to what is it leading? Is this an act of God, is it the natural course of societal evolution, or is it something that has been intentionally contrived, and if so, by whom and to what purpose?

Read the full article here

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: The Last Fair Deal

A VC - July 31, 2020 - 4:31am

Playing cards and listening to the blues is the perfect combo and this deck of cards celebrates that.

I backed this project immediately when I saw it this morning.

It has five days to go and is 70% of the way to its goal. If you love cards and the blues, check it out.


USV TEAM POSTS:
Categories: Blog articles

Repost: Open Up Vs Break Up

A VC - July 30, 2020 - 5:37am

I was in a board meeting for most of yesterday so I did not watch the theatrics on Capitol Hill. William told me that there were many calls for breaking up the big tech companies. So I thought I would repost this which I wrote about a year ago.

There have been many calls to break up the large Internet monopolies; Amazon, Google, Facebook, Apple, etc.

Breaking up a large monopoly feels like a very 19th/20th century move to me.

I would prefer that politicians and policy makers think about opening up as the better intervention.

A good way to explain this is to go back to the architecture that Twitter used in its early days when there were many third-party Twitter clients. Imagine if Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc were protocols, not applications, and there were many high-quality clients to participate in these networks.

Then the clients could innovate on things like content filtering, promotion of high quality content, business model, etc

If we are going to “break up” these large social media platforms, I would urge elected officials and regulators to think about pushing them to move from platforms to protocols instead of just ripping them apart.

We could do the same thing with search. Our portfolio company DuckDuckGo has built a nice search business by building a different user interface on top of one of the two leading search indexes. If we made it easier and reliable for others to innovate on top of the core search engine, then there might be many more options in search.

In mobile, a good first step is to open up the app stores and allow the browsers to have the same access to the operating system as native mobile apps.

In commerce, if I could checkout as easily everywhere as easily as I can on Amazon, there would be more competition for my shopping dollars.

I think you get the idea. It is very true that the big Internet services have built centralized monopolies and have consolidated their market positions. We do need more competition in these core services. And the best way to do that is to force them to open up their services, not break them up.


USV TEAM POSTS:
Categories: Blog articles

Is This One For Real?

A VC - July 29, 2020 - 5:31am

Crypto has been on a tear in the last week.

Bitcoin is up 18% in the last seven days:

Ethereum is up over 30% in the last week:

But this isn’t the first time we’ve had a bullish run in crypto since the bear market started in early 2018.

If you look at the total market cap of all crypto tokens you can see that this bear market has had several moves up followed by downward price action:

So why will this time be any different? I certainly don’t have a crystal ball, but there are some underlying factors in this run-up that make me think it might be different this time:

1/ There is real fundamental activity in the decentralized finance sector where lending, borrowing, staking, swapping, and yield optimization are all growing significantly in recent months. This chart of the activity on the Uniswap liquidity network is indicative of that:

Categories: Blog articles

Entrepreneurship And The Climate Crisis

A VC - July 28, 2020 - 5:29am

Vinod Khosla penned a fantastic blog post this week outlining how a few entrepreneurs have made a material impact on clean energy and reducing our collective carbon footprint in the last decade and how a few more can move the needle even further in the next one.

Vinod starts off with this statement:

12–15 entrepreneurs, driven by entrepreneurial energy and passion for a vision, and a little bit of luck, could change the climate crisis into societal transformation

This is music to our ears as USV has started to back climate-focused entrepreneurs. I hope that we can back one or two of these 12-15 innovators in the coming years. That would be great for society and great for USV too.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Jul 31, 2020
Hardware-based Identity

Categories: Blog articles

Walking Away: From the “New (Old) World Order,” into the Old (New) World Order. Part I

Beyond Money - July 27, 2020 - 1:32pm

ObeySleep1

Global pandemic, social distancing, widespread shut-downs, testing and “tracing,” economic crisis, and more recently, massive protests and social unrest, not just in the US, but around the world — What does it all mean? Like virtually everyone else in the world, my attention lately has been focused on that question.

I don’t feel terribly anxious about Covid-19, even though for me personally it poses a significant existential threat. Although I’m fortunate to have no chronic illnesses, I am well advanced in years, and according to some recent reports, my gender, blood type, and ethnic heritage may put me further at risk.

I am more concerned about the social, political and economic impacts of the situation and governments’ reactions to it which may turn out to be more disruptive than the pandemic itself. At the same time I am hopeful, even optimistic, that this crisis brings with it great opportunities for positive changes that are long overdue.

Read the full article here

Categories: Blog articles

The Startup Community Way

A VC - July 27, 2020 - 4:21am

My friend Brad Feld has updated his excellent book on startup ecosystems called Startup Communities. The updated and expanded book is called The Startup Community Way and it is available for pre-order on Amazon. The book comes out tomorrow so you won’t have to wait long for it.

The timing of this book is excellent. The pandemic has shown that you don’t have to live and work in any particular place to be productive and innovative.

This suggests to me that we will see tech entrepreneurship and innovation move even more broadly around the US and around the world this decade and The Startup Community Way can be a playbook for how to make that happen.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Jul 31, 2020
Hardware-based Identity

Andy Weissman — Jul 28, 2020
Meet Cute (or, one way to create a new media business)

Categories: Blog articles

Reclaiming the Credit Commons

Beyond Money - July 25, 2020 - 5:59pm

The concept of the “credit commons” is something I articulated at length in my 2009 book The End of Money and the Future of Civilization, along with a thorough description of how it can be reclaimed from monopoly control. In November of 2010 I was invited to participate in the International Commons Conference: Constructing a Commons Based Policy Platform Economy, sponsored by the Heinrich Böll Foundation, in Berlin, Germany.

In my presentation there I pointed out that credit is a crucial aspect of the commons that has been generally overlooked, and that reclaiming it is crucial to any attempt to promote social justice, economic equity, democratic government and a world that works for everyone.

This video is a composite of the video record that was made and the slides that I showed at that time. It can also be viewed at Credit Commons on YouTube.

Categories: Blog articles

Funding Friday: The Steamchasers

A VC - July 24, 2020 - 4:24am

I am a big believer in the saying “you can’t be what you can’t see.” And I have spent a lot of time and energy finding ways for young people to see careers in science, technology, and innovation so that they can put themselves on a course to have one themselves.

I came across a series of books for kids called The Steamchasers on Kickstarter today. These are books about a group of kids, The Steamchasers, who take a scavenger hunt through town finding the contributions Black Americans have had to our everyday lives in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math. The first and second books in the series are available on Amazon.

The third edition is being funded on Kickstarter right now and I backed it this morning.

For those of you reading on the web, here is the video. If you are reading on email, you can watch the video here.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Jul 31, 2020
Hardware-based Identity

Andy Weissman — Jul 28, 2020
Meet Cute (or, one way to create a new media business)

Albert Wenger — Jul 27, 2020
The Threat of a Trump Dictatorship

Categories: Blog articles

Headgum and Gumball

A VC - July 23, 2020 - 6:03am

Podcasts have emerged as a major new category in media/entertainment/news/education etc. We have seen huge deals for big podcast hosts like Bill Simmons and Joe Rogan, both of whom did transactions with Spotify for nine-figure amounts. But as Spotify (and surely others to follow) lock-up top podcast content to strengthen their subscription offerings, we stand to lose something awesome about podcasts which is the ability to listen to them for free on any platform we choose.

But the counter weight to this trend is the growing size of the “live reads” ad market. This is when a podcast host reads out an advertisement on the show. This has been a staple of talk radio for many years. I remember Howard Stern doing live reads for LoJack back when Howard was on CBS Radio. Live reads are powerful and a form of influencer marketing. If you love Howard and he waxes eloquently about LoJack, you love LoJack. Or so it seems.

The live reads ad market for podcasts was in excess of $700mm in 2019 and seems headed to a multi billion dollar ad market in the coming years. So there is certainly a lot of money out there for podcast hosts who want to stay free and independent, or are emerging and building an audience.

And that is where Gumball comes in. Gumball is a marketplace where advertisers post live read ads and podcasters pick them up and read them on their shows. Ad-buying opportunities within podcasts have historically been manual and limited, not unlike the process of purchasing web ads pre-2000. As podcasts continue to gain market share, Gumball’s self-serve ad marketplace has the opportunity to be as transformative to the podcast industry as Google Adwords was for web ads. 

Gumball is a subsidiary of the Headgum podcast network. Headgum is a network of owned and operated comedy podcasts as well as third party podcasts that join the Headgum network for distribution and monetization (via Gumball).

USV has been looking for an opportunity to invest in podcasting that fits with our thesis and we found it with Headgum and Gumball. We like the way that Headgum’s owned and operated content, its Headgum network content, and its monetization platform Gumball all fit together and enhance each other. We made an investment in Headgum recently and blogged about it on the USV blog this morning.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Jul 31, 2020
Hardware-based Identity

Andy Weissman — Jul 28, 2020
Meet Cute (or, one way to create a new media business)

Albert Wenger — Jul 27, 2020
The Threat of a Trump Dictatorship

Categories: Blog articles

Open Source Exposure Alerting Apps

A VC - July 21, 2020 - 6:35am

The Linux Foundation announced its Linux Foundation Public Health initiative yesterday.

They are starting with two open-source exposure alerting apps called Covid Shield and Covid Green. These are two apps that use the Google Apple Exposure Notification (GAEN) infrastructure. The codebase for both apps has been open-sourced.

The Linux Foundation had this to say:

“To catalyze this open source development, Linux Foundation Public Health is building a global community of leading technology and consulting companies, public health authorities, epidemiologists and other public health specialists, privacy and security experts, and individual developers,” said Dan Kohn, LFPH general manager. “While we’re excited to launch with two very important open source projects, we think our convening function to enable collaboration to battle this pandemic may be our biggest impact.”

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/tech-leaders-and-health-authorities-from-around-the-globe-collaborate-to-combat-covid-19-301096039.html

Countries, states, public health organizations, etc can build on these open source code bases to create exposure alerting and other apps that can help with the Covid pandemic and potentially other public health issues going forward.

I quite like how this is playing out. Google and Apple have built the base level infrastructure, the open source community is coming together to build the application level code base, and governments and public health organizations can take all of that and put applications into the market.

I am hoping we will see applications built this way coming to market in the near future.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Nick Grossman — Jul 31, 2020
Hardware-based Identity

Andy Weissman — Jul 28, 2020
Meet Cute (or, one way to create a new media business)

Albert Wenger — Jul 27, 2020
The Threat of a Trump Dictatorship

Categories: Blog articles

Landline Phones

A VC - July 20, 2020 - 1:46pm

I know so many people who don’t have landline phones. They simply have their cell phone and use it for everything.

But I also know a lot of people who are working from home (or a rented place, a vacation home, etc) right now and struggling with their cell phone reception and other issues.

I grew up in a time before cell phones and have always had a landline phone. I still use a landline phone. But I have used the power of voice over IP (VOIP) and the cloud to make landline phones work better for me and I thought I’d share that “hack” with all of you.

I’ve ported all of the landline numbers I’ve had over the years to the cloud and host them in a cloud-based PBX called Onsip.

I then use a VOIP phone (my favorite right now is a DECT-based VOIP phone from Yealink) to connect to one or more of those numbers in the cloud.

That way, my landline phone number can follow me from my office, to my home, to my Airbnb, to my wherever.

This also allows us to have different numbers; a home number, a work number, multiple work numbers, and even a number that only a few people have (which I like to call “the batphone”).

If you would like to combine the reliablility of a landline phone with the mobility of a cell phone, try a cloud based PBX and VOIP phones. It’s a great combination and works great for us.


USV TEAM POSTS:

Andy Weissman — Jul 28, 2020
Meet Cute (or, one way to create a new media business)

Albert Wenger — Jul 27, 2020
The Threat of a Trump Dictatorship

Nick Grossman — Jul 27, 2020
The Beauty of Focus

Hanel Baveja — Jul 23, 2020
Headgum

Categories: Blog articles

New Podcast Episode

Beyond Money - July 18, 2020 - 5:35pm

Episode 9 A conversation with Jose Francisco Garcia Mazcorro

Jose Francisco Garcia Mazcorro (Pepe) (Born in July 1982), is a scientist and educator who from 2000 to 2005 studied Veterinary Medicine and, in 2011, received a PhD degree from Texas A&M University.

Upon his return to Mexico in 2012, Pepe and his wife, Alicia, who also holds a PhD from the same university, started a program they called “Free Science Classes.” Pepe currently spends most of his academic life working on various research projects related to the human and animal microbiome. He also has an interest in Social Philosophy and published a book on that subject in 2007.

In this podcast interview, Pepe describes his work of taking science directly to children, provides some insights into Mexico’s current political situation and the implications of the election in 2018 of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), and discusses the status of the COVID “pandemia” in Mexico, its consequences, and possible remedies to avoid an even more complicated scenario in the years ahead. You can learn more about Pepe and his work at his personal website athttps://sites.google.com/site/josefgarciamazcorro/home. Pepe also recommends this video about social distancing.

Categories: Blog articles
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